2.2 kw spindle 220v vs 110v question


(Maxwell Kirsner) #1

hello all. I bought a 2.2kw spindle setup new from a local guy, i assumed it was 110v and it turned out to be 220v. i have no 220v in my shop. does anyone know if the spindle that came in the 220v kit will work if i just buy a 110v VFD or should i sell the whole kit and buy a 110v kit?


(mikep) #2

Yes, with the right VFD. You need a “single phase 110v” VFD to go from 110V. Be careful, as it’s a lot easier to find single phase 220v. Be sure you get one that’s large enough for what you need.

Here’s a very high quality Mitsubishi ($300)

Here’s a cheaper one ($140):


(Maxwell Kirsner) #4

my spindle says 220v right on the spindle, ya think it will still work with the 110vfd?


(mikep) #5

Read the spec -
Maximum Amps
4.2 A

Input
1-Phase
100-115V

Output
3-Phase
200-230V


(Maxwell Kirsner) #6

How about this guy?

VFD 110V 2.2KW 3hp Variable Frequency CNC Motor Drive Inverter Converter for Spindle Speed Control HUANYANG HY-Series(2.2KW, 110V) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0775F4G47/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_5jSLBbK8F8C04


(mikep) #7

No, has 110V output.
specification:
modle:HY02D211B
power:2.2KW
horsepower:3HP
->>>Input voltage:1 or 3 phase110V 60Hz
->>>Output voltage:110V,3 phase
Output frequency: 0.5-400Hz
Input Frequency: 47-63Hz
Output Current: 20A

The two critical parameters are input voltage and output voltage. The ones with 220v output will cost more than the 110 in -> 110 out ones.


(Maxwell Kirsner) #8

The only vfd I’m seeing with 110v input and 220v output is that Mitsubishi one. Even the eBay one you linked to says 110 output. All the eBay ones and Amazon ones that I’m seeing say 110 to 110. Am I missing something?


(Craig) #9

Depends upon the voltage across the phases. Is the voltage per phase Or peak -peak voltage ?


(mikep) #10

I’m seeing a number of them from various vendors (Bardac makes them, E3 series) but they are tending to be quite a bit more expensive.

Here’s a Fuji

I don’t think it likely you’ll find much bigger for 110v though - maybe 3/4HP, probably not 1HP (could be wrong though…definitely no larger than 1HP) I think this means you’re out of luck - 750W ~ 1HP. At best you’re going to get 1.1kw over a low line (110/115) cable. With losses…

If you need 2.2kW…I’m pretty sure you’re going to need a hi-line input (230/240v), it’s not coming in off a 115V single phase.


(Craig) #11

A 2.2kW to run at full power will require a 25 amp 120VAC circuit and appropriate wire gauge. Typical household breakers are 15 amp.

Lower quality VFDs will have a lower efficiency rating and require more current than a higher quality VFD.


(William Adams) #12

Yeah. there was a good post made to reddit on power considerations recently which I cribbed at: https://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/Spindle_Options#Power_Considerations

2.2kw is about 3 HP. 1 HP is 745W, 745*3 = 2235W (which isn’t far from 2.2 * 1000). W/V=A, therefore 2235W/110V = 20.31 A, and thats assuming no losses in your transformer/inverter, voltage drop in your household wiring or other equipment running on the same circuit. Most 110V outlets are 15A though there are some rated for 20A. The reason you don’t see any inverters that turn 110V power into 220/3ph power above a certain HP/kW rating is that there simply isn’t enough amperage on the circuit to drive them

So it looks like there are three possible upper power levels for an electric motor in the U.S. (if one can dedicate a circuit to it):

  • 110V @ 15A
  • 110V @ 20A (requires a suitable circuit and plug)
  • 220V @ 20A — tap into the stove or dryer plug

(it’s too early to do math)

The next question is, what is the optimal motor size/diameter for each of those power ratings, and after that, what is the largest diameter tool which would make sense, and what speed rates would generate suitable chiploads w/in the range of feed rates the machine is capable of, which results in the corollary: Are there any such ratings which are not addressed in the market?

The Kress 800-FME seems to indicate there might be some lacunae: https://mctinfo.net/kress-800-fme

I know I’d give a lot for a spindle which:

  • was 110 AC @ 15 amps
  • quiet (unfortunately the Kress is noted as loud)
  • narrower than 65mm (want to reduce lever effects)
  • used an ER-20 collet, or had a 1/2" collet option — the Makita having a 3/8" collet option makes this seem achievable
  • had a brushless motor — been considering buying the 18v Makita trim router and just wiring it to a suitable power supply — weird to me that the Kress uses brushes
  • air cooled

(Luke) #13

This might or might not help but my 2.2kw 220/240v spindle is on a 15a used plug. Hasn’t blown…


(Craig) #14

A 220V 15A breaker will provide 3300W of power. Just remember ohms law.


(Maxwell Kirsner) #15

Here’s a stupid theory (because house electrical is not my field of expertise) but a 2.2kw spindle running on 110v on a 15 amp will still run but only up to 1600 watts or so? Am I right or is this not safe?


(Craig) #16

It would likely trip the breaker when the Spindle exceeds 1500W of load. If certain failures occur in the proper sequence, an electrical fire could occur. By design and proper engineering the breaker should trip first, but things happen.