Die Filer (File Machine) Project for the Shapeoko3 AND the Nomad


(Richard Cournoyer) #1

Here is a sneak peek:

Files, drawings, and videos coming soon.


Rookie -advice needed
(Anthony) #2

I’ve been following your progress on Instagram and have been looking forward to you posting this here. :slight_smile:


(Dan Nelson) #3

This is so incredibly sweet!!! I want to make one bad, I may even make a second one for work(I get sequestered to do little sheet metal projects in the prototyping shop every so often and this would be a big help!).

Looking good Rich!

Dan


(Winston) #4

Damn… I guess I’ll be making one of these as soon as I finish my drum sander…


(William Adams) #5

For those who aren’t familiar with this tool and are curious about it:

http://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?258088-Great-Old-Machine-A-Die-Filer


(William Adams) #6

Actually, this brings to mind an old book and a concept which I wanted to act on when I was younger — making a machine shop more-or-less from scratch.

Had a copy of Vol. 2 of the “Gingery Books”:

http://gingerybooks.com/

In short, the concept is that the lathe is the only tool in a machine shop which can duplicate itself, so one uses investment casting to make a lathe, then use the lathe to improve itself (or make a nicer one), then make the other tools needed for a complete machine shop.

More of a hand tool guy myself, so my one tool design is far simpler:

https://www.shapeoko.com/projects/project.php?id=154

(which is listed at: https://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/List_of_Tools along w/ some other plans — I’d love to fill out all the ones which it would make sense for us to make on our machines).

I guess we need a second page or a section on machine tools which are reasonable to make on a Nomad/Shapeoko — we did allude to this idea on the 3D printer page: https://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/3D_Printing and there are a few more at: https://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/Online_resources#Tools


(Luke) #7

Very interesting - do you have a video of it working?


(William Adams) #8

If you’re inclined, you can look at the machine to puzzle out how the mechanics of it work — makes one wonder if there aren’t mechanisms which weren’t practicable on an industrial basis, but which might be suited for creation w/ our hobby machines and used for hobby-oriented purposes — anyone see anything potentially useful at:

http://507movements.com/

?

There was an amusing collection of mechanisms from daVinci’s notebooks in the exhibit of his which is making the rounds. Well worth attending if one gets the chance, esp. if one has children:

https://discoverdavinci.com/