Kudos to Mr Beaver and his genoristy


(Griff Carpenter) #1

Some may remember that I built Mr Beavers HDZ from the plans he provided.

I’m now at the beginning of a mod to my router mount as I want to lower it and further stiffen it. I’ve designed a double ring mount sized for a Makita. Plus a new mounting plate and a “tram mount”.

I cut the “tram mount” and am very pleased with the outcome.
Surfaced to precisely 6mm, all bores spot on and no intrusions into the blue tape across the entire part. Cool Nothing special about feeds and speeds, on the conservative side.


(Ken Chalk) #2

Nice work. I’m about to pull the triger on his DIY CNC kit.


(Griff Carpenter) #3

Thanks. It’s a nice machine no doubt!

Part 2 in progress.


(Griff Carpenter) #4

Ha, that was dumb. Spending all that time hogging out the center.
Plan B in effect. Plus I get a nice disc to use for something else instead of a pile of chips. Just have to keep the chips clear as the slot deepens.


(Luke) #5

Are you making a double router mount?


(Griff Carpenter) #6

Yes indeed.
Originally I printed a sleeve adapter from ABS to fit the Makita to the stock SO3 mount. I’ve decided I would prefer metal to metal contact to ensure rigidity. Of course, I’m no engineer but it just feels right.
And, since I need to move the mount all the way to the bottom of the front slider plate I’m going to make another of those as well.


(Luke) #7

Nice, I love seeing people take this to the next level!

I smell a 2.2kw water cooled spindle coming…


(Griff Carpenter) #8

And…all finished.

Never knew I’d enjoy working metal so much. Thinking about some sort of v-carving on the various bits…


(Luke) #9

thats tasty!!!


(Vince) #10

Awesome looking parts Griff! Metal is a blast on this machine!

Check out picking up a 3m convolute bench grinding wheel to really finish the surface easily. Makes a super professional surface finish.


(Griff Carpenter) #11

You mean there’s better finishing methods then 120 grit flapper on my portable drill? Thanks for the tip, appreciate it.

I was not too happy with the inner faces but didn’t have a tool small enough to finish them nicely. Not to mention, I’ll never see ‘em again as they’ll be covered up by the Makita. Another story if I was marketing them.


(Frederico) #12

those look very familiar! :wink:


(Griff Carpenter) #13

They do indeed. If I had seen the link you posted and used it I would certainly have acknowledged it, no problem.

There are only so many ways to make parts like this. I did not include design files but happy to share.

My design attaches each bracket to MrBeavers designed easy tram as per the original Carbide3D screw dimensions and sizing. The file you link references thru screws, wouldn’t have worked for me as tramming that design would be…difficult.


(Frederico) #14

No worries. I completely agree.

great work


(Robert) #15

Hey Griff, that looks awesome! what kind of feedrate, end mill size and router speed were you running? I have struggled cutting aluminum in the past and haven’t tried it again since. Were you using any kind of lubricate on the end mill? Thanks, I would appreciate it!

Rob


(Griff Carpenter) #16

Hey @remooney, thanks! Happy to share but, I’m still a beginner at cutting aluminum so, not the best to learn from probably.

Design/CAM done in Fusion360.
Cut is a simple contour with multiple depths, doc 0.6mm. Keep in mind, it is a narrow/deep slot so chip clearing is a must after the first 6 mm or so. I just chased the router with my shopvac every few minutes.
Endmil was 1/8" flat carbide turning at about 12K. Feedrate about 400mm/min. No lubricant used, particularly for narrow slots - it just gunks up the chips and guarantees failure.

Learning to cut aluminum is not no hard, lots of experts in this forum.

For me the key’s were to 1. slow things down and 2. reduce initial plunge speed into the piece 3. reduce doc to less than a mm.

I cut my entire copy of Mr. Beavers 1st HDZ on a stock SO3 XL.