"Must have" things when starting out on a SO3

I’ve been using a Nomad for a while now and will soon get my hands on a SO3 XL. One of the things I noticed is that even with a small and newbie-friendly machine as the Nomad, there are some things that will make working with a CNC a lot easier if you take the time to set them up. An example being proper ways of holding material.

What’s on your list of “must haves” for the SO3? (Links to tutorials if relevant will be appreciated.)

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You’ll want a secondary waste board that you can fly cut and maintain a level working surface. The stock waste board will dip in the middle enough to alter your Z depth considerably.
T-track or threaded inserts and a layout for your waste board to allow for proper work holding. Remember you will be able to work on much larger pieces with the SO3. Congratulations and G/L, Ray

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This has been discussed a bit in the past, and is an FAQ: https://shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/FAQ#Usage

Big things:

The machines are wonderfully complementary — hoping to have a project which takes advantage of both machines done soon. One thing to consider is you can use the Shapeoko to cut replacement MDF beds for the Nomad, and the Nomad to make clamps for the Shapeoko:

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I use the masking tape/super glue method for work holding where speed trumps supreme accuracy. Dollar Stores have real Super Glue brand in various sizes.

I’d also start thinking now about dust collection.

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A hot glue gun is awesome for holding work piece.

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I’ve built a couple dust collection separators, round with a tangential side entry and a narrow slot around about 240 degrees in the bottom. I can’t remember the name… They worked great and one is planned for the Shapeoko. Thanks Phil ???

Haha, hope they’re working well for you.

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I think you mean a Thien baffle separator.

http://www.jpthien.com/cy.htm

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my memory does get baffled…

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I see what you did there