Need a good V-bit Software


(George J. Foreman) #21

After starting with Carbide Create and Motion, I tried Fusion 360. Still have it loaded on my Windows PC, and may yet give it another try, but it’s a bit hardcore mechanical CNC for me. I just want to make some sawdust, signs, artwork, and the occasional 3D carving, not mill out the next Space Shuttle. Tried several more of the inexpensive or free options, but at 67, I didn’t want to spend years bouncing from one to the other, so, I bought Aspire. Though Aspire is almost certainly over-kill for my current needs, I love it, mainly because I know I won’t later have to to deal with the dreaded WAF to pursue an upgrade from Cut-2D, V-Carve or V-Carve Pro.

I think the best thing about the Vectric software is the amazing user interface that the different versions have in common. Regardless of which version you start with, each more advanced version builds upon the same interface, buttons etc, so you aren’t faced with learning an entirely new package. Their web support, web training, and the collection of YouTube videos, both Vectric and independent, are amazing. I’m particularly impressed with the Vectric for Beginners series by Mark Lindsay. Most of his stuff is aimed at V-Carve users, but I have to look at the tiny print in the upper left corner of his screen to see if he’s running V-Carve or Aspire. If you’re on the fence about a Vectric package, check out one of his videos.


(Vincent Morel) #22

As much as I love and Use Fusion360 for designing and tool path, I always ended with better results for V-Carving with Vcarve (I use it in VirtualBox on my Mac). More option for controlling the Tool Path for V-Carving in V-Carve…