Need some help w/ this GCode

So I’ve been using Easel for a while now to cut 2d shapes, and it’s been working fine. Recently, they updated the software and now, when it comes to cutting out the tabs, 2 odd things happen:

  • The cutter moves to the safety height - so it doesn’t just move up the height of the tab, it moves all the way up above the stock
  • During the final few passes, where it’s moving up and down for the tabs, the cutter changes direction - so it’s humming along counter clockwise the entire cut, then it plunges and starts to move clockwise around the stock

The change in direction near the end is messing up all of my cuts. I’m not sure why, but it’s like the cutter is all of a sudden on a different path and is chattering against the side of the stock. Is this the climb vs. non-climb in terms of cutting direction?

In any case - I’m wondering if I can post the GCode here, and someone can help me figure out how I can manually fix it. Or, is there something I can look for in terms of the cutter changing direction in the code, and then go in and fix it?

Thanks!

Here is the part of the code where things get wonky - the rest of the shapes that are cut (in this case, hearts) have the same issue

G1 Z-0.45500 F9.0
G1 X5.82433 Y5.93151 F40.0
G1 X5.87383 Y5.93671 F40.0
G1 X5.92273 Y5.94604 F40.0
G1 X5.97067 Y5.95942 F40.0
G1 X6.01732 Y5.97677 F40.0
G1 X6.06235 Y5.99797 F40.0
G1 X6.10546 Y6.02285 F40.0
G1 X6.14633 Y6.05126 F40.0
G1 X6.18468 Y6.08299 F40.0
G1 X6.22024 Y6.11781 F40.0
G1 X6.25277 Y6.15549 F40.0
G1 X6.28202 Y6.19576 F40.0
G1 X6.30781 Y6.23833 F40.0
G1 X6.32994 Y6.28291 F40.0
G1 X6.34826 Y6.32919 F40.0
G1 X6.36265 Y6.37684 F40.0
G1 X6.37299 Y6.42553 F40.0
G1 X6.37923 Y6.47491 F40.0
G1 X6.38132 Y6.52464 F40.0
G1 X6.37923 Y6.57437 F40.0
G1 X6.37299 Y6.62375 F40.0
G1 X6.36265 Y6.67243 F40.0
G1 X6.34826 Y6.72008 F40.0
G1 X6.32994 Y6.76636 F40.0
G1 X6.30781 Y6.81094 F40.0
G1 X6.28202 Y6.85352 F40.0
G1 X6.25277 Y6.89379 F40.0
G1 X6.22024 Y6.93146 F40.0
G1 X6.18468 Y6.96629 F40.0
G1 X6.14633 Y6.99802 F40.0
G1 X6.10546 Y7.02642 F40.0
G1 X6.06235 Y7.05131 F40.0
G1 X6.01732 Y7.07250 F40.0
G1 X5.97067 Y7.08985 F40.0
G1 X5.92273 Y7.10324 F40.0
G1 X5.87383 Y7.11256 F40.0
G1 X5.82433 Y7.11777 F40.0
G1 X5.77457 Y7.11881 F40.0
G1 X5.72490 Y7.11568 F40.0
G1 X5.67566 Y7.10841 F40.0
G1 X5.62720 Y7.09705 F40.0
G1 X5.57986 Y7.08166 F40.0
G1 X5.53398 Y7.06238 F40.0
G1 X5.48987 Y7.03932 F40.0
G1 X5.44784 Y7.01265 F40.0
G1 X5.40820 Y6.98255 F40.0
G1 X5.37121 Y6.94925 F40.0
G1 X5.33714 Y6.91297 F40.0
G1 X5.30622 Y6.87396 F40.0
G1 X5.27867 Y6.83250 F40.0
G1 X5.25470 Y6.78888 F40.0
G1 X5.23445 Y6.74341 F40.0
G1 X5.21808 Y6.69641 F40.0
G1 X5.20570 Y6.64820 F40.0
G1 X5.19740 Y6.59912 F40.0
G1 X5.19324 Y6.54952 F40.0
G1 X5.19324 Y6.49975 F40.0
G1 X5.19740 Y6.45015 F40.0
G1 X5.20570 Y6.40108 F40.0
G1 X5.21808 Y6.35287 F40.0
G1 X5.23445 Y6.30586 F40.0
G1 X5.25470 Y6.26039 F40.0
G1 X5.27867 Y6.21677 F40.0
G1 X5.30622 Y6.17532 F40.0
G1 X5.33714 Y6.13631 F40.0
G1 X5.37121 Y6.10003 F40.0
G1 X5.40820 Y6.06672 F40.0
G1 X5.44784 Y6.03663 F40.0
G1 X5.48987 Y6.00996 F40.0
G1 X5.53398 Y5.98690 F40.0
G1 X5.57986 Y5.96761 F40.0
G1 X5.62720 Y5.95223 F40.0
G1 X5.67566 Y5.94086 F40.0
G1 X5.72490 Y5.93359 F40.0
G1 X5.77457 Y5.93047 F40.0
G1 X5.82433 Y5.93151 F40.0
G1 Z0.10000 F9.0
G0 X5.95950 Y5.95630
G1 Z-0.48000 F9.0
G1 X5.95950 Y5.95630 F40.0
G1 X5.97067 Y5.95942 F40.0
G1 X6.01732 Y5.97677 F40.0
G1 X6.06235 Y5.99797 F40.0
G1 X6.10546 Y6.02285 F40.0
G1 X6.14633 Y6.05126 F40.0
G1 X6.18468 Y6.08299 F40.0
G1 X6.22024 Y6.11781 F40.0
G1 X6.25277 Y6.15549 F40.0
G1 X6.28202 Y6.19576 F40.0
G1 X6.30781 Y6.23833 F40.0
G1 X6.32994 Y6.28291 F40.0
G1 X6.34826 Y6.32919 F40.0
G1 X6.36265 Y6.37684 F40.0
G1 X6.37283 Y6.42471 F40.0
G1 Z0.10000 F9.0
G0 X6.35516 Y6.69717
G1 Z-0.48000 F9.0
G1 X6.35516 Y6.69717 F40.0
G1 X6.34826 Y6.72008 F40.0
G1 X6.32994 Y6.76636 F40.0
G1 X6.30781 Y6.81094 F40.0
G1 X6.28202 Y6.85352 F40.0
G1 X6.25277 Y6.89379 F40.0
G1 X6.22024 Y6.93146 F40.0
G1 X6.18468 Y6.96629 F40.0
G1 X6.14633 Y6.99802 F40.0
G1 X6.10546 Y7.02642 F40.0
G1 X6.06235 Y7.05131 F40.0
G1 X6.01732 Y7.07250 F40.0
G1 X5.97067 Y7.08985 F40.0
G1 X5.92273 Y7.10324 F40.0
G1 X5.88693 Y7.11008 F40.0
G1 Z0.10000 F9.0
G0 X5.61450 Y7.09293
G1 Z-0.48000 F9.0
G1 X5.61450 Y7.09293 F40.0
G1 X5.57986 Y7.08166 F40.0
G1 X5.53398 Y7.06238 F40.0
G1 X5.48987 Y7.03932 F40.0
G1 X5.44784 Y7.01265 F40.0
G1 X5.40820 Y6.98255 F40.0
G1 X5.37121 Y6.94925 F40.0
G1 X5.33714 Y6.91297 F40.0
G1 X5.30622 Y6.87396 F40.0
G1 X5.27867 Y6.83250 F40.0
G1 X5.25470 Y6.78888 F40.0
G1 X5.23445 Y6.74341 F40.0
G1 X5.21808 Y6.69641 F40.0
G1 X5.20570 Y6.64820 F40.0
G1 X5.20172 Y6.62460 F40.0
G1 Z0.10000 F9.0
G0 X5.21835 Y6.35208
G1 Z-0.48000 F9.0
G1 X5.21835 Y6.35208 F40.0
G1 X5.23445 Y6.30586 F40.0
G1 X5.25470 Y6.26039 F40.0
G1 X5.27867 Y6.21677 F40.0
G1 X5.30622 Y6.17532 F40.0
G1 X5.33714 Y6.13631 F40.0
G1 X5.37121 Y6.10003 F40.0
G1 X5.40820 Y6.06672 F40.0
G1 X5.44784 Y6.03663 F40.0
G1 X5.48987 Y6.00996 F40.0
G1 X5.53398 Y5.98690 F40.0
G1 X5.57986 Y5.96761 F40.0
G1 X5.62720 Y5.95223 F40.0
G1 X5.67566 Y5.94086 F40.0
G1 X5.68710 Y5.93918 F40.0
G1 X5.68710 Y5.93918 F40.0
G1 Z-0.51000 F9.0
G1 X5.68710 Y5.93918 F40.0
G1 X5.67566 Y5.94086 F40.0
G1 X5.62720 Y5.95223 F40.0
G1 X5.57986 Y5.96761 F40.0
G1 X5.53398 Y5.98690 F40.0
G1 X5.48987 Y6.00996 F40.0
G1 X5.44784 Y6.03663 F40.0
G1 X5.40820 Y6.06672 F40.0
G1 X5.37121 Y6.10003 F40.0
G1 X5.33714 Y6.13631 F40.0
G1 X5.30622 Y6.17532 F40.0
G1 X5.27867 Y6.21677 F40.0
G1 X5.25470 Y6.26039 F40.0
G1 X5.23445 Y6.30586 F40.0
G1 X5.21835 Y6.35208 F40.0
G1 Z0.10000 F9.0
G0 X5.20172 Y6.62460
G1 Z-0.51000 F9.0
G1 X5.20172 Y6.62460 F40.0
G1 X5.20570 Y6.64820 F40.0
G1 X5.21808 Y6.69641 F40.0
G1 X5.23445 Y6.74341 F40.0
G1 X5.25470 Y6.78888 F40.0
G1 X5.27867 Y6.83250 F40.0
G1 X5.30622 Y6.87396 F40.0
G1 X5.33714 Y6.91297 F40.0
G1 X5.37121 Y6.94925 F40.0
G1 X5.40820 Y6.98255 F40.0
G1 X5.44784 Y7.01265 F40.0
G1 X5.48987 Y7.03932 F40.0
G1 X5.53398 Y7.06238 F40.0
G1 X5.57986 Y7.08166 F40.0
G1 X5.61450 Y7.09293 F40.0
G1 Z0.10000 F9.0
G0 X5.88693 Y7.11008
G1 Z-0.51000 F9.0
G1 X5.88693 Y7.11008 F40.0
G1 X5.92273 Y7.10324 F40.0
G1 X5.97067 Y7.08985 F40.0
G1 X6.01732 Y7.07250 F40.0
G1 X6.06235 Y7.05131 F40.0
G1 X6.10546 Y7.02642 F40.0
G1 X6.14633 Y6.99802 F40.0
G1 X6.18468 Y6.96629 F40.0
G1 X6.22024 Y6.93146 F40.0
G1 X6.25277 Y6.89379 F40.0
G1 X6.28202 Y6.85352 F40.0
G1 X6.30781 Y6.81094 F40.0
G1 X6.32994 Y6.76636 F40.0
G1 X6.34826 Y6.72008 F40.0
G1 X6.35516 Y6.69717 F40.0
G1 Z0.10000 F9.0
G0 X6.37283 Y6.42471
G1 Z-0.51000 F9.0
G1 X6.37283 Y6.42471 F40.0
G1 X6.36265 Y6.37684 F40.0
G1 X6.34826 Y6.32919 F40.0
G1 X6.32994 Y6.28291 F40.0
G1 X6.30781 Y6.23833 F40.0
G1 X6.28202 Y6.19576 F40.0
G1 X6.25277 Y6.15549 F40.0
G1 X6.22024 Y6.11781 F40.0
G1 X6.18468 Y6.08299 F40.0
G1 X6.14633 Y6.05126 F40.0
G1 X6.10546 Y6.02285 F40.0
G1 X6.06235 Y5.99797 F40.0
G1 X6.01732 Y5.97677 F40.0
G1 X5.97067 Y5.95942 F40.0
G1 X5.95950 Y5.95630 F40.0
G1 X5.95950 Y5.95630 F40.0
G1 Z-0.51500 F9.0
G1 X5.95950 Y5.95630 F40.0
G1 X5.97067 Y5.95942 F40.0
G1 X6.01732 Y5.97677 F40.0
G1 X6.06235 Y5.99797 F40.0
G1 X6.10546 Y6.02285 F40.0
G1 X6.14633 Y6.05126 F40.0
G1 X6.18468 Y6.08299 F40.0
G1 X6.22024 Y6.11781 F40.0
G1 X6.25277 Y6.15549 F40.0
G1 X6.28202 Y6.19576 F40.0
G1 X6.30781 Y6.23833 F40.0
G1 X6.32994 Y6.28291 F40.0
G1 X6.34826 Y6.32919 F40.0
G1 X6.36265 Y6.37684 F40.0
G1 X6.37283 Y6.42471 F40.0
G1 Z0.10000 F9.0
G0 X6.35516 Y6.69717
G1 Z-0.51500 F9.0
G1 X6.35516 Y6.69717 F40.0
G1 X6.34826 Y6.72008 F40.0
G1 X6.32994 Y6.76636 F40.0
G1 X6.30781 Y6.81094 F40.0
G1 X6.28202 Y6.85352 F40.0
G1 X6.25277 Y6.89379 F40.0
G1 X6.22024 Y6.93146 F40.0
G1 X6.18468 Y6.96629 F40.0
G1 X6.14633 Y6.99802 F40.0
G1 X6.10546 Y7.02642 F40.0
G1 X6.06235 Y7.05131 F40.0
G1 X6.01732 Y7.07250 F40.0
G1 X5.97067 Y7.08985 F40.0
G1 X5.92273 Y7.10324 F40.0
G1 X5.88693 Y7.11008 F40.0
G1 Z0.10000 F9.0
G0 X5.61450 Y7.09293
G1 Z-0.51500 F9.0
G1 X5.61450 Y7.09293 F40.0
G1 X5.57986 Y7.08166 F40.0
G1 X5.53398 Y7.06238 F40.0
G1 X5.48987 Y7.03932 F40.0
G1 X5.44784 Y7.01265 F40.0
G1 X5.40820 Y6.98255 F40.0
G1 X5.37121 Y6.94925 F40.0
G1 X5.33714 Y6.91297 F40.0
G1 X5.30622 Y6.87396 F40.0
G1 X5.27867 Y6.83250 F40.0
G1 X5.25470 Y6.78888 F40.0
G1 X5.23445 Y6.74341 F40.0
G1 X5.21808 Y6.69641 F40.0
G1 X5.20570 Y6.64820 F40.0
G1 X5.20172 Y6.62460 F40.0
G1 Z0.10000 F9.0
G0 X5.21835 Y6.35208
G1 Z-0.51500 F9.0
G1 X5.21835 Y6.35208 F40.0
G1 X5.23445 Y6.30586 F40.0
G1 X5.25470 Y6.26039 F40.0
G1 X5.27867 Y6.21677 F40.0
G1 X5.30622 Y6.17532 F40.0
G1 X5.33714 Y6.13631 F40.0
G1 X5.37121 Y6.10003 F40.0
G1 X5.40820 Y6.06672 F40.0
G1 X5.44784 Y6.03663 F40.0
G1 X5.48987 Y6.00996 F40.0
G1 X5.53398 Y5.98690 F40.0
G1 X5.57986 Y5.96761 F40.0
G1 X5.62720 Y5.95223 F40.0
G1 X5.67566 Y5.94086 F40.0
G1 X5.68710 Y5.93918 F40.0

G1 Z-0.45500 F9.0

If your Z0 is top of stock this is an awfully deep plunge. A good rule of thumb is no more than 1/2 the diameter of the tool (end mill). This much, especially with an 1/8" end mill, is going to cause of chatter.

The cut vs. plunge rates looks good (40 vs. 9) - 4 to 1 is a good rule of thumb for the ratio (until you know more about the tool and material).

Climb vs. conventional cutting can cause chatter but at the speeds you’re moving at I would expect the difference to affect the finish more than anything.

Since the G code is generated by a program, there isn’t too much we can do without being familiar with the software. Recalculating direction requires chasing virtually all of the G code - doable but a lot of manual math and editing.

Let’s see if we can find your issue now…

The G code looks… inefficient. That’s due to the way the software works. Circle cutting should use G02/G03. This would be MUCH smaller if it did.

Here is the visualization. It does exactly what you describe (you’re not crazy).

This is crazy inefficient G code generation. The full retracts are often a setting in the software. The post processor should allow for G02/G03 (circles).

They changed the software for the worse… sorry. Maybe someone who knows the package can advise?

That’s a good one for softer materials. We had a bit more detail in the ShapeOko wiki:

  • harder materials (steel and cast iron and harder alloys): 8 to 10% of feed rate
  • softer materials (softer aluminum alloys and brass, denser/harder plastics and composites, exceptionally hard woods): 15 to 20%.
  • softest materials (most plastics and varieties of wood): 30 to 50% (a useful guideline is one-fourth the feed[Need some help w/ this GCode])

(and as you can see I added your values)

Can’t recall where those percentages came from though — if anyone knows of a reputable reference w/ those numbers I’d be glad of them.

The code I posted is not the first cut - it’s right near the end of the cut.

I was using a .03" depth per cut and a 40ipm feedrate.

I’m starting to wish I kept the old .nc files I created with Easel - but I deleted them all and started fresh when they updated the program (thinking it was better.)

If you’ve used Easel on your machine, check the settings for Grbl — Easel has been known to re-write the settings, esp. the $102 # of steps for the Z-axis to match the settings suited to the Shapeoko 2 and similar machines w/ a threaded rod for the Z-axis.

For an SO3, see: http://docs.carbide3d.com/article/38-shapeoko-3-default-grbl-settings

Hello Will!

I trained as physicist. There was/is never a budget or availability for the parts one needs (you want an inlet port for a Nitrogen laser???). We had to make things ourselves. Which meant we had to learn how.

I was first taught machining by machinists of the Manhattan Project era (near the end of their careers). They were an amazing bunch… I miss them.

They were very concerned about safety (try machining precision molds for explosives; plutonium), fine finish (try machining…), correctness (we have to get this done quickly and correctly, there is a war on), and low waste (there is a war on).

We learned/worked on hand driven knee mills (Bridgeport, a company still in business). Learn to do it manually, then add automation (which was governor driven motors).

Things were handed down orally, student to teacher, so I do not know of a written reference. I will dig our my Machinery and see what I can find something this weekend. As a machining and CNC teacher myself I still pass along what they taught me, albeit updated for the CNC age.

In there honor, I pass along what I was taught.

A) Never, never, never put any part of your body inside the work volume when the spindle is engaged.

The end mill can cut through steel. Your hand is softer. A mistake only takes an instant.

When manually milling, always keep your weak hand behind your back (grasp your belt).

Always wear short sleeve shirts or turn up your sleeves and use a band to keep them that way.
Nothing that might catch on the machine.

B) A drill is 4 times better at plunging than cutting. An end mill is 4 times better cutting than plunging.

C) Do not cut material deeper than 1/2 the diameter of your end mill.

(Mark) Some modern end mills can do more (e.g. full diameter). Don’t get cocky. Start
conservatively and safely.

D) Plunge an end mill at 1/4 the cutting feed rate.

E) Learn to HEAR and FEEL chatter.

We would intentionally cause chatter, in different types of materials, until we could detect it
instantly. What’s known a unconscious competence.

E) When dealing with a new material and/or tool, perform tests.

  1. Look up the chip rate (per flute) from the material vendor. Calculate the feed and speed.

    (Mark) There are programs available today that take the pain out of this and get the initial
    setting quite close to optimal. See G-Wizard Calculator for one of the best examples
    I know of.

  2. Start with the general guidelines above - even if the end mill vendor says differently.

  3. Don’t depend on linear cuts to determine chatter and finish. Cut chevrons with a bend of more
    than 30 degrees.

F) Never, never, never trust a feeds and speeds formula from an outside source - test it carefully.

Spindle power, lubrication, axis drive motor power, and end mill sharpness can be different.
Materials with the same specification can be slightly different from different vendors - and batch
to batch.

(Mark) Feeds and speeds formulas for wood can be dangerous! Oak from Arkansas can be quite
different in hardness and density than oak from Illinois… or Spain. TEST IT CAREFULLY!

G) Diverge from the simple guidelines slowly. Get things in production quickly using the good enough
your determine from your initial tests. Use downtime to optimize.

H) Finish is a big deal. It’s not about getting the geometry (shape) cut correctly, it’s also how clean
the finish is. Finish is not only about looking good, it can be a critical requirement in some usages.

(Mark) See “try machining precision molds for explosives; plutonium”

I) Use the correct tool for the job. If you don’t know, ASK!

(Mark) Do not go for cheap end mills from unknown sources. They are crap.

          Go with tools from known quality sources. Do not shy way from something like an AlTiN
          coating because the end mill cost 50% more - it will last 3-5 times longer than High
          Speed Steel (HSS) and cut faster!

          Example: that Onsrud end mill for cutting polycarbonate that cost $30 will last nearly forever
          and since it is optimized for the job will give you amazing cut speeds and fine finishes.

(Mark) My “go to” tool vendors are Niagra and Onsrud. My “go to” coating is AlTiN. YMMV.

(Mark) Carbide3D has very good end mills. I don’t buy them because I have $$$ of tools already.

(Mark) Carbide end mills are not all that same. If you’re looking for quality end mills the necessary
phrase is “solid carbide, micro (fine) carbide”. Coatings increase the life of the end mill
considerably more than the increase in cost - and they allow machining to go faster too.

          If people are interested I can do a posting about how end mills (and drills) are made, how to
          select/order them, and to not get lost in the coatings forrest.

J) Never waste time, resources or energy. If you’re going to have to repeat something, think about
how to use jigs and fixtures to make the work flow be efficient.

(Mark) Learning to “think in jigs/fixtures” is one of the hardest things to learn in machining. It’s really
scary to watch a master machinist machine a jig to machine a jig to machine a part and not to
see why they could see how this was necessary, instantly, from the outset. Well worth the effort!

(Mark) Safety should be the first priority.

       Spindles moving at high speed and running at high revolution rates can be dangerous. A
       broken end mill or a poorly fixtured part can go flying at high speeds.

       An enclosure should be a very high priority item. If not, eye protection is a must.

       Spindles moving at high speed and running at high revolution rates create a lot of noise.
       That noise can damage your hearing. You can still damage your hearing even if the sound
       doesn't seem so loud - damage is a function of intensity (loudness) and exposure time. CNC
       machines often run for (very) long periods of time...

       Yes, mowing the lawn is dangerous to your hearing.

       An enclosure should be a very high priority item. If not, hearing protection is a must. One
       of the cheapest hearing protectors are those used for shooting. Get one with at least 25
       dBa of suppression.

       Those wanting to design enclosures should look into profession grade noise suppression
       materials. They are cheap since one does't need too much of them for an enclosure for a
       small machine. I can help if anyone wants to know.

       Spindles moving at high speed and running at high revolution rates create particles, not
       "saw dust". The particles are extremely fine (0.3-5 microns (millionths of an inch) and these
       are as or more dangerous than Asbestos.

       Another reason to be concerned are (exotic) hardwoods. Many of these are "tropical" and they
       contain viruses we've not be exposed to. They also contain compounds that when machined
       hard generate some nasty vapors.

       An enclosure should be a very high priority item. You've got a CNC machine - make one!
       The enclosure should have a dust collector system. Minimally, your dust collector should
       have a HEPA filter rated for 0.3 microns. Ideally, one should have a dust separator - a cyclone -
       ahead of the dust collector. It will increase the life of your expensive HEPA filters dramatically.

       A good, safe dust collector system doesn't have to be expensive. Yes, something like a
       professional, internationally rated piece of equipment like a Festool can be used... but if
       one cannot afford it, go with a good "shop vac" with a 0.3 micron rated HEPA filter and a
       plastic cyclone (e.g. see Oneida). Remember to empty the cyclone and "shop vac" OUTSIDE.
       Stand upwind or get a good face mask with 0.3 micron rated filters (3M makes some good
       masks at a good price).
3 Likes

I use a waterline cutting path to do my 2d shapes out of MeshCAM.
Sorry to hear about this.

@ApolloCrowe Is there a way I can copy and paste images in MeshCam? I nest 5 - 6 wooden shapes per 8" x 8" board and haven’t seen a way to add shapes and move things around in mesh cam.

And FYI - Cut2d seems like it will work for me (now that I installed parallels and windows on my Mac), and it’s cheap ($150)

Darren,
There is no way to do multiples in meshcam.

How are you preparing your artwork?

Can you duplicate in inskape or illustrator, then open it in meshCAM?

Yes - I can give that a try in illustrator. I guess it just makes it easier if I can move things around in the CAD as opposed to just using an image. But let me give it a try and we’ll see!!

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@ApolloCrowe what do you set the surface angle at to cut out a 2d shape when using waterline?

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Darren, What CAD do use?
I use Rhino

For a 2D waterline tool path I don’t think it applies.

heres a link:
http://www.grzsoftware.com/blog/how-to/surface-angle-limits/

I was using Easel as my CAD - so basically I have no cad experience. But I have Vetric cut2d now which is dead simple to use like easel, but gives me a lot more control over every detail.

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Funny you mention that… I’m writing a Nomad specific post processor for the Vectric products just now…

I hope to have something available in a few days.

I posted the Vectric post processors.

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