Probe continuity test before it actual starts probing XYZ axis

I have ruined a few bits already as probably everybody else has too.

You need a test before the actual probe for XYZ begins. Basically a continuity test.

So when I go into probe, and click start, first it asks for a continuity test once passed, it allows me to click again to start the probe. People can cheat but, it is a safe guard. I rather have the extra step then ruin a $30 to $100 bit.

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I got in the habit of lifting the probe to touch the endmill prior to running probe.

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That would be a good step to put as an option in Carbide Motion. If it is on, it asks that you place the clip on the endmill and touch the probe then it lets you run the probing sequence. If it is off, it just runs the probing sequence normally.

I thought this was where that little LED light on the puck comes into play?

If not, what purpose does it serve again?

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Yes the light will tell you that you have continuity but it does not “force you” to make a continuity test before probing. If it was a two step process, people would not look at the endmill crash into the probe in horror when they forgot to put the clip on the endmill, they would be reminded to attach the clip and CM would not proceed with probing.

Ok, but if you hook it up and check for the LED to shine, it will confirm continuity?

It sounds like it works, and you’re requesting a redundancy? Excuse my ignorance, I do not have first hand experience.

It is suppose to be redundant. When you hit probe in CM you better have that clip on your bit else your going to drive that bit into your CM probe block. If you have the new HDZ Z axis screw drive that will really drive it down and who know what you will screw up.

The idea is to basically do a sanity check to make sure you have the clip on the bit to make the conection. Honestly, if they just put a second question after you hit probe in CM. Hit probe button, second button comes up, " DID YOU CONNECT THE CLIP TO YOUR BIT" hit yes to continue or no to exit.

Its basically the term conditions when you load any software, are you sure you want to do this?

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Ah ok I’m getting a better sense of the workflow.
Haven’t touched CM since I setup my machine so I’m unfamiliar.
Perhaps it would make sense to have it as a toggle setting in your preferences. Are there machine settings/preferences in CM?

Some could say its excessive to have so many ‘dummy’ dialog boxes or steps to run the machine.
If you’re familiar with the setup procedure you would get tired of the extra/redundant clicks just to get it to go. Much like an added dialog box/pop up before allowing the program to run for other things…

“Did you remove all loose material/tools/etc from the wasteboard area?”
“Did you power up the spindle/vacuum?”
“Did you tighten the collet?”
Etc

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Yes it could get tedious but contrary to cleaning the wasteboard, installing the work piece or turning on the spindle, forgetting the clip is easily done. BTW, CM even tells you what endmill to install before proceeding. While this is not my suggestion, I think it has value and as I had suggested above, this clip reminder/continuity test should be an option that someone familiar with the workflow can turn off.

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Thank Luc, you see the value. Going off on did you do that did you do that, well if you forgot alll those things you probably should watch some more videos on CNCing. Bit changes are a common thing. This probe if you forget to clip it or make a connection you could litteraly cause some major damage if you drive your bit into probe. The belt driven Z will probably skip like crazy and freak you out when your machine is driving straight into a peice of metal. Imagine that with the new HDZ screw drive Z, which I have. I don’t want to imagine what it will do if I forget the clip.

Testing your probe is a good thing, even if you clip it on doesn’t garantee it will work. If a connection comes loose or you didn’t get the connection setup properly then you are screwed. Adding a simple step to verify is nothing compared to repairing your machine after you drove your bit into a block of metal.