Workspace air quality

Hello,

It’s been awhile since I’ve been on the forum, as my CNC has been out of commission while I finish my basement/workspace.

With that being said, I am going to be working in the space as before, but instead of an unfinished basement, it will be my office. We’ve insulated the ceiling for sound and will be putting up drywall next week. I’m going to have luxury vinyl planking on the floors for easy sweeping. And, my current enclosure which is made from angle iron and plexiglass, will be replaced with a wooden one in the near future.

While I don’t notice much dust or mess outside my enclosure (thanks to my Festool collector) I want to make sure my computers, 3d printers etc are ok in the space. Are there any possible air purifiers or machines that I can run quietly to keep the dust down overall?

Thanks!!

First thought was outside air vent. But I don’t think it would create enough air flow, and would mess with internal climate control.

A home air purifier would likely help. Cheapest ones I see on google are about $150. I think it would need to move a good bit of air to make a difference in the dust level in the room.

Another thought would be your home heating/cooling system. You’ll probably want to keep that residual dust out of the furnace. Might consider some kind of filter over the air return if there is one in that room.
And honestly, that might be enough air flow to filter out a lot of the residual dust if it’s an option.

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I find that running my Festool CT Midi markedly improves overall air quality — if there seems a bit of dust hanging in the air I just wave it around a bit as I vacuum up after a cut.

I would suggest a small, quiet unit with a HEPA rated fan.

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So you have sort of 2 questions to ponder to deal with whatever the festool is not collecting:

  1. The air dust inside your enclosure
  2. The air dust outside your enclosure

For outside the enclosure… there’s many hepa filter based air purifiers out there, and the good ones have a sensor that are used to adjust the speed of the filter automatically (highly recommended). The “vacuumwars” guy on youtube started testing these filters if you want to see reviews :slight_smile:

For the inside enclosure… I did something crazy but it’s surprisingly simple. I got an inline duct fan (I used https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07JB292JC but there’s many different ones at different price/noise points… just make sure to get one with a speed controller). I put this inside a box into which I made pretty large openings on the sides/top. I used merv fabric (but you can just use small premade filters as well) to cover these holes… e.g. a filter box. Then a proper sized hole in my enclosure, a flexible tube to connect my enclosure to the inline fan in the box, a small bit of mesh to cover the enclosure hole (to prevent large chunks getting into the fan) and… voila an air filter setup for my enclosure. I run this while cutting and a few minutes after I’m done, and a lot of the dust in the air inside the enclosure gets taken care of.

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Arjan, good suggestions.

The thought of a cheap box fan with a premium (Hepa type) furnace filter duct taped to it also had occurred to me :laughing:

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My machine and all my tools are in the garage. Years ago I installed a Jet Air filter that has multiple speeds to cycle the air in the garage pretty quickly. It worked well for about a year or so and then started humming whenever it was plugged in even if it was turned off. I could never get a straight answer from Jet on that. It has been mounted to my garage ceiling for 1+ years now and not used. I would love to replace it but it’s a lot of money for something to fail quickly. Maybe I just need an electrician to figure out why there seems to be some voltage leak or whatever.

Obviously I don’t have an enclosure.

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Thanks for all the advice! I really appreciate it.

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If you don’t measure the air quality, you just don’t know.

How many have this combo (in addition to a quality vac filter?) This runs any time that I’m making or moving dust. It gets measured air quality down to double digits in my 600 sq. ft. shop, if I want it to.

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A second thumbs up on the Dylos monitor. It’s the really fine dust that’s dangerous, the stuff you can’t even see floating in a sunbeam coming in through a window. What the Dylos measures are larger particles as well as these invisible ones. Despite really good dust/chip collection, you will be amazed what your breathing.

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