1/24th scale instrument panel milled on my Nomad 883 Pro


(Bruce Johnson) #1

Here are some pictures of a dashboard for a locomotive I am building using my Nomads 883 Pro.

The piece measures 12mm x 28mm. The smallest end mill I used was .40mm. I cut around the instrument marks so I could paint them and they would be proud of the background to accept the paint. This took about an hour to machine because the bit was so small.

It is hard to see the detail because the acrylic is clear but it is there. Once primer is sprayed on, the details should ‘pop’ out. A US penny for comparison on the size.





(Bruce Johnson) #2

I’m sorry folks, I think this should have been in the gallery. Maybe the powers that be can move it there!


(mark robinson) #3

Dont have powers but threw it in the gallery for ya,you have pics of the locomotive your working on? sounds really nice


(Bruce Johnson) #4

Here are some photos everything except the rivets and the plastic screws, used to represent springs, have been cut with my Nomads 883 Pro.

The red is from paint effected by the solvent for the acrylic.








(mark robinson) #5

Holy cow!, :astonished: That thing is amazing.Very cool project. thanks so much for sharing the extra pics.


(Newton Burcksdale) #6

Very nice! Keep going, new pics would be cool


(Bruce Johnson) #7

Finally, I got around to priming my Atlas locomotive. Sorry for the bad pictures! :slightly_frowning_face:

Everything was drawn in Carbide Create and milled in acrylic with a bit of brass with the exception of the plastic screws, rivets and the mechanism.

It’s been a fun project!

Now on to painting and weathering… then making some v dumps to pull behind it.











(Phil Thien) #8

Alright, that is pretty nifty.

I did some googling on 1/24 scale trains, this would be considered G-Scale?


(Bruce Johnson) #9

Yes, it is G scale but alas G scale can be any of the following, 1/24, 1/25, 1/22.5 & 1/20.3.

Mine represents what is called Gn15, which means G scale (1/24) running on 15 inch track. It would be what they call a very small industrial plant locomotive.

Look up Gn15 and you will see what I mean. Lots of fun!

Bruce