Newbie CAM question


(Jonny Bergdahl) #1

I did my first real work by cutting holes in an aluminium power supply front. This was my first time using Fusion 360 for CAM work, but I did get some help from a friend working with “real” CNC machines, even though he knew nothing about Fusion 360.

Anyway; this is the result.

I really don’t like the sound it makes, it sounds to me that nothin in my CAM is right.

I am basically looking for helpful tips to make me a better machinist.

Regards;
/jb


(martin redeby) #2

If you like reading https://www.cnccookbook.com/chatter-in-machining-milling-lathe-vibration/

Or if you prefer video this playlist is a good start. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bupr_IR-_Pk&list=PL9tn9rGywKUWqqCXlVNEDs1lbSoE6H2a6 (and the rest of the channel should be you go to mealtime entertainment for the next month or so :stuck_out_tongue: lots of good tips)


(Phil Gorsuch) #3

I did the same for my aluminum project boxes - sure beats the drill and dremel for a clean panel.

The NYC CNC youtube channel is my favourite, but this HAAS video is in my mind the top of heap that I have seen for quickly explaining chatter:

Let us know how it goes on your next aluminum cut - and how the power supply turns out.


(Jonny Bergdahl) #4

The worst part of the sound seems to be related to me placing the machine directly on the desk. Any recommendations of a suitable material to place under the machine?

Getting rid of that sound would make it easier to hear the actual chatter.

Regards;
/jb


#5

Mine sits on four pads of a medium hardness memory foam. The stuff sucks up vibration and the bearing is pretty uniform between the four corners. It sits on top of a sheet steel (reverberant, low stiffness top) small-drawer cabinet that holds tooling. Nearly nothing transfers.


(Phil Gorsuch) #6

I have mine on a grounded antistatic mat. Double win - sound supression and prevents static buildup when machining plastics in winter.