Recent Projects


(Jordan Hale) #1

I just wanted to share some of the most recent stuff I made.


(James Carter) #2

I don’t want to be a debby downer… but you need to check licensing for those team logos you’re using, especially if you plan on selling that stuff.

Great looking work though!!!


(Jerry Gray) #3

Nice work and ideas.
I make a lot of stuff with the Punisher skull on it too.


(Carl Hilinski) #4

I’ll second the licensing stuff. You just can’t profit from someone else’s property. I get constant requests for themed stuff using logos and other licensed materials. You simply have to walk away from that stuff. Licensing is really a sticky issue. I interviewed with a major online Tshirt seller several years ago and I asked them how they were able to print tshirts with licensed material on them. They told me they were responding to specific requests from customers and the shirts were not being made for resale. I’ve also been told by a licensing expert that if a customer provides you with a decal of a licensed logo, that’s okay to use since the decal-buyer got the right to use it as desired when he/she bought it. If you look into licensing, you’ll find that most teams, for example, don’t do anything with it themselves; they contract it out to some huge companies that do nothing but handle licensing. I think it’s a dangerous path to follow.


(Carl Hilinski) #5

This is some additional information about using licensed material for commercial sales. I spent a good amount of time in the last week trying to track down patterns/artwork that could be used in products that I could sell. I’ve found two sites that permit free commercial use: openclipart.org and vecteezy.com. At vecteezy, you have to check whether the author for the particular piece you want to use permits its use in a commercial product. You can also go to sites like shutterstock.com, but you could pay a (what I consider) hefty price to license a piece of art. For example, for two items, it’s $199. It’s something like $29 for two downloads it it’s for personal use, but you really pay for the commercial use.

I also noted something interesting at vecteezy. There are, for example, portraits of Jimi Hendrix. The author’s license says you can use it commercially, but I think the Hendrix estate might have a lot to say about that. I know they’ve gotten pissy with some commercial uses (I have a bottle of vodka with Jimi’s picture on it that was pulled from the shelves after the family complained).

Maybe the wiki ought to have a section about where to get free art for personal and commercial use. I’m sure Will is going to chime in very shortly (if he hasn’t already) to tell me that already exists.


(William Adams) #6

Openclipart.org is listed at: https://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/Online_resources#Clipart

Haven’t tried listing commercial sites — didn’t seem reasonable since there are so many, and they come and go so often.


(Jordan Hale) #7

They are donations, so no money to be made.


(mikep) #8

I’ve used this to find some great stuff.


(Carl Hilinski) #9

If whomever you give them to makes money (for example, auctioning them off or selling them) you need a license. Also, imagine if you made something with a licensed logo on it and gave it to some organization that used it to either promote their views or sold it to further their aims. What if the license holder does not believe in that? For example, what if you used the Liberty University logo on something that supports a pro-choice organization?

A lot of people think, “Oh, I’m so small. They’re never going to bother with me.” But what happens if some other person who paid for the right to use a licensed logo sees your product competing with his and discovers you don’t have a license and files a complaint with the license holder?


(ray) #10

The title was Recent projects not let’s talk licensing. You made your point with the first 2 chapters you posted.
Jordanhale, nice work!!!


(Carl Hilinski) #11

Hey, when did you become the moderator? There was a perfectly good reason for further explanation because his reply implied that licensing doesn’t matter if you’re donating. Maybe there are other people who actually care to protect themselves and not count on using ignorance as a defense.


(ray) #12

Hey, when did you become the sites legal council ? He was just posting pictures of his recent projects. If you are so concerned that the community be informed of licensing, then start a new thread dedicated to it. You posted here Calling All Makers: Carbide Community Monthly Build #4 starts now! and praised his work. He stands to win a prize pack for his bootlegged coasters, yet not a peep ?
Better to Remain Silent and Be Thought a Fool than to Speak and Remove All Doubt!
Once again jordanhale, great job !


(mark robinson) #13

Ummm Hows the weather?


(Chad Howell) #14

Weird to see a man damned for trying to keep another out of trouble. Keep doing what you Boothecus, it’s helpful to many of us that use our cnc’s to make things. No one wants a legal battle


(James Carter) #15

It’s not really unusual actually. I’ve grown accostomed to it… but try as I might, I still can’t let a fellow man walk blindly into a legal nightmare. I guess it’s a personal flaw, since I almost always get roasted for trying to help.

Great Example… the Punisher skull is owned by Marvel.
https://marvel.com/help/category/11


(Eric) #16

Marvel Entertainment, LLC (formerly Marvel Enterprises and Toy Biz, Inc., and marketed and stylized as MARVEL) is an American entertainment company founded in June 1998, merging Marvel Entertainment Group, Inc. and ToyBiz. The company is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company…

Marvel is a subsidiary of Disney!!! Believe me, if you haven’t heard from Disney’s lawyers yet you almost certainly will.


(Carl Hilinski) #17

I probably should know better than to say anything else, but someone might find this of interest or find it helpful. Shutterstock. If I buy an image from Shutterstock and use it commercially as often as I want, I have to pay the commercial rate (about $100). However, a customer of mine could buy any image from Shutterstock for personal use (and pay about $19), send me the vector file and I can use that image in any number of things I make for that customer. Shutterstock told me this directly. You, of course, should always seek your own confirmation of statements like this.