2-sided ornament I made today

Made from what I think is white pine. This wood is from the original construction of the church in 1884. (This is a very old building by USA standards :slight_smile: )

It’s a christmas ornament for my in-laws who were married in the church 40 years ago. (The church burned and was demolished this year.)

This was a challenge to myself in a number of different ways. Because this wood is first-growth it is very fine grained, and I really pushed that to the limit here. Did not intend for that to be part of the challenge but it certainly came out that way.

I have some design tweaks which I will make, if I make more of these. The hole at the top is a bit dodgy, and ugly. The cross got ruined in the roughing passes because of a CAD mistake, or at least a poor choice on my part. Interested to read your thoughts.

Whatever finish I use here will need to have a lot of what I call “capture” – don’t know the right term? It will need to essentially glue this thing together before it breaks. I’m up for suggestions.

SO3 XL
Roughing with an 1/8-inch flat end mill Amana 46299
Finishing with 1/32 ball end Amana 46280
Carbide 3D 60-degree V for the text

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That is awesome, very nicely done indeed!

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Mr. Snake :smiley: , I would arrange toolpaths to leave an allowance (0.005" to 0.010") for one last toolpath to finish the part.

Before cutting that last toolpath, I would immerse this ornament into a bath of de-waxed shellac for a minute. Then let that drip-dry for an hour or so.

This will harden that outer layer and make it less likely to chip out.

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This is beautiful! Well done

Thank you. I tried this today and it’s great. Much faster and cheaper than epoxy.