Carbide Motion 3D Manual - Issues With Zeroing

(Peter Cheimets) #1

Folks,

Is there a Carbide Motion users manual anywhere? Or even a description of what its features are, and how they work? I can use it at the most basic level, but I don’t know what MDI is, or how to use it. I’d like to be able to set the zero without having to jog the machine into the zero position (if possible). I get the feeling there is more that I could do, if I knew how, I just don’t know how.

Thanks

Peter

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(Mark Bellon) #2

Learning to set your zeros is a fundamental skill required for machining.

For instance, I machine things of radically different sizes, sometimes with the clamp, other times with fixtures on the bed (and spoiler). Things move all over the bed… the X0Y0 constantly changes for me.

It is possible to machine a jig, learn it’s location and work X0Y0 from that point (by memory). @FlatBaller does this. You can see how it works here:

Another way X0Y0 can be avoided is to use stock large enough that their fixture will not be touched by their machining. That being the case, an arbitrary point within the stock can be X0Y0 - just be sure everything to machine fixes within the stock and doesn’t hit a fixture!

Another X0Y0 technique uses a laser crosshairs. This probably doesn’t fit in machines with 3 inches or less of Z unless the laser is attached to the gantry and aligned with the spindle/router (at a known offset).

The Z0 of your part can also be avoided - by working Z0 from the bottom of their stock (top of their spoiler). This requires that there be a spoiler board and that it is machined flat (via the machine). Like a recorded X0Y0, the Z0 can be memorized.

None-the-less, learning to use edge finders, touch top Z0, and other zeroing techniques will actually help you to learn how to optimize them.

mark

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(William Adams) #3

I’d like to view the ShapeOko wiki as the manual for the machine and software, but no one seems to read it: http://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

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(Peter Cheimets) #4

Can you set the zero by edge finding, and then typing a value (the radius of the edge finder) rather than moving the spindle the radius of the edge finder and then zeroing? The only way I know how to set the zero is to place the edge finder on the side of the part (say in X), zero X, and then move the edge finder above the part, move in X an additional distance equal to the radius of the edge finder, and then zeroing again. On other machines I have used, you find the edge, and type in the radius (plus the appropriate sign), and you are there. Is that possible?

Thanks

Peter

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#5

Yeah, in the “Set Zero” dialog, the fields where it shows you the current coordinates are writable - you can just click your mouse in them and type in what you want.

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(Mark Bellon) #6

Can you set the zero by edge finding, and then typing a value (the radius of the edge finder) rather than moving the spindle the radius of the edge finder and then zeroing? The only way I know how to set the zero is to place the edge finder on the side of the part (say in X), zero X, and then move the edge finder above the part, move in X an additional distance equal to the radius of the edge finder, and then zeroing again. On other machines I have used, you find the edge, and type in the radius (plus the appropriate sign), and you are there. Is that possible?

The offset fields in the zeroing screen are there to avoid the double move.

See:

There is a procedure there for general zeroing on a Nomad/SO3.

mark

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(Peter Cheimets) #7

Thanks everyone, that was very helpful.

Peter

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(Cindy Rhoades) #8

The software needs a written manual that actually tells you step by step instructions on what each field is for and how to set it up because what is in the “manual” you referred to is pretty much useless. In putting my machine together I pretty much threw it on the floor because it says keep these bolts loose and then it never tells you to go back and tighten them up and the part for actually running the machine is almost pointless because it tells you nothing. I know there are videos but who wants to have to have 2 computers set up so you can watch a video to be able to load a job and run it?

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(Mark Bellon) #9

A written manual for CM would be great.

mark

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(William Adams) #10

There are some step-by-step tutorials as part of the instructions for the previous version: http://shapeoko.github.io/Docs/

Also at: http://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/Run_Your_First_Job and http://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/Run_Your_Second_Job

Also see:

http://docs.carbide3d.com/article/37-shapeoko-3-hello-world
and
http://docs.carbide3d.com/article/71-getting-started-reference

If there’s something specific you need which you’re not finding at: http://www.shapeoko.com/wiki/index.php/Main_Page please let us know.

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