Inlay Oops (Opportunity?)


(John Ellenberger) #1

I finally got around to doing my first Vcarve inlay and ended up overcutting the female (twice). First time I just filled it for resin so it wouldn’t go to waste. 2nd time was off by .01 or so and since I’m impatient I glued the inlays in leaving a gap about a business card stock width in some places. Find myself wondering if I could essentially do font outlining by putting resin or something else in the gap.

Anybody ever do this? Material to use?

Backing is maple. Letter inserts are Wenge.


(Brad Agdern) #2

I stuck to this tutorial/parameters and after i dialed in my machine tolerances, had excellent success. It also does a good job explaining how the parameters impact the inlay. I did use VCarve Desktop (what they use in the video) – I think doing this with success in CC/CM will take a lot of trial and error.


(Neil Ferreri) #3

I saw someone doing the exact same thing (outlining a miscalculated inlay with resin) here or on a different forum.
The idea behind v-carve inlays is that they are very forgiving…gaps should be underneath the inlay.

I recently did my first one. I had watched one of those vectric videos, and once I understood how it was working (it’s a lot simpler of a concept than those videos make it seem) I made one in Easel. I was actually shocked how well it worked compared to the effort put in.
I’m only an aspiring woodworker, so I asked @Griff for help on the finish. Black walnut inlaid in hard maple, rubbed in danish oil finish. About 12" x 6"


(John Ellenberger) #4

Ok just to be clear I was using the simple inlay toolpath (different tutorial). The vcarve takes a lot of material and I was using some wenge 1/8" scraps that I leftover from Xmas ornaments. In the tutorial she uses 0.02 overcut. My first pass this looked too small from a test fit so I overdid it and went something like 0.08. Ended up filling that one with resin. Then I think I went 0.04 and it was still big. Worried about consistency at this point but eventually will work out a process. Probably not on this 3/4 maple backing–the stuff is hard as a rock.


(mikep) #5

It’s still beautiful maple :slight_smile: - the curl is very nice.