Quick Actions for Carbide Motion

Now that we have quick actions, I thought that it would nice to have a place to share actions that you have found useful.

There doesn’t seem to be a way to directly export / import actions, but since everything is text copy and paste will do.

To start things off, here’s my first contribution:

Name:
Tool change (XL size)

Description:
Retract on Z, then move to front center to change tools

GCode:

G90 G21
G53 G00 Z-3
G53 G00 X-420 Y-350
G54
6 Likes

I use this at the end of the day so that the next time I use the machine, homing will complete quickly.

Name:
Park

Description:
Move close to homing location

GCode:

G90 G21
G53 G00 Z-10
G53 G00 X-10 Y-10
G54
2 Likes

Great idea
Same coding.
I added 3.
Home, homes it and park it there.
Park, clears the work space by going to the back middle.
Load, moves to high over the bit setter.

These mini-programs make a lot of sense to me…I think the ideal would be a PC command line file that would send these GCode commands to the USB port. Then a Shortcut to the command line file could be placed on the taskbar at the bottom of the screen…

Wonder if anyone could put together a PC Batch File the opens the USB port, sends GCode, the closes the port? Wish I knew more about usb/serial communications!

This sort of thing has been done, see “gctrl” which is a Processing script:

Processing is pretty approachable (still really bummed that when I tried to use it to make PDFs they had rounding errors so that dimensions weren’t consistent)

Other candidates in this space are:

  • bCNC — written in Python, it actually has a templating system for G-Code
  • grblgru — this is a full-fledged design tool

Thanks Will

As I thought about this, I decided it would be a good idea to experiment without risk to my SO3 controller. So, I took an Arduino Uno (lots of those in my “parts dept”) and uploaded GRBL 1.1 to it. My plan is (was) to connect the Arduino to a PC in my office (heated & comfy vs. my cold and not so comfy workshop) and run CM to try things.
It appears that CM does not recognize just any old GRBL controller board! Is there a way to configure my Arduino “simulator” (no GRBL board, no steppers, just an Uno) to tell CM that it’s a SO3 controller? When I hit “Connect to Cutter”, it can’t find one even though it’s connected to a GRBL 1.1 board.
My Arduino does act like a GRBL controller with other software UGS, etc. But CM doesn’t “see” the Arduino as an SO3 controller…
OR, am I missing something based on my admittedly low level of expertise with all this software/firmware?

CM expects a specific USB vendorID/productID to recognize a Shapeoko/Nomad controller, so you’ll have to experiment using those other gcode senders

1 Like

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