Tapered Endmill

(Luc) #1

I have seen posts from many people mentioning using tapered endmill and I can’t seem to find much information on these. I looked in the Wiki but did not see anything, it does not appear in the endmill section but maybe I missed something.

Could someone provide where I can find information as to when to use them, how are they defined in Carbide Motion, what to look for when getting one e.g.: number of flutes or size of taper, etc. material where they can be used successfully.

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(William Adams) #2

Usually tapered endmills are used for 3D cuts — Carbide Create doesn’t allow one to define them, nor does Carbide Motion.

You can get a preview of how they’ll cut using CAMotics if you work out a need to manually do CAM with them.

I believe MeshCAM and most other 3D CAM programs support them — Vectric might as well.

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(Stuart) #3

I use them for finishing 3d relief carvings, I have a few like this one 0.5mm tapered end mill - Ebay

Basically they are the same as a ball end mill, but let you have a much finer ball on the end, giving you a lot more detail, but because of the taper to a 1/4" shank they are a lot stronger so you can take deeper/wider cuts with them

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(Luc) #4

If you created a toolpath in a 3D program like F360, couldn’t you run the GCode in CM?

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(William Adams) #5

Yes. We have instructions on that here: https://docs.carbide3d.com/software-faq/fusion360/

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(Nathaniel Klumb) #6

I use tapered end mills for the finishing pass and path engraving pass on my terrain relief model carvings. They get me the detail of a very small ball-nose end mill but with much longer reach, allowing me to make deeper carves without crashing the collett into the walls.

I use PixelCNC to create the toolpaths, and then I run the G-code using Carbide Motion.

As for procuring tapered mills, I use basically the same ones as Stuart gets on eBay, but I get mine at Amazon in various sizes. (They’re probably from the same source in China, so it’s just whatever source is convenient, really.) Basic two-flute 1/4" shank, 31.75mm flute length, with whatever taper angle geometry requires for a given tip radius.

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(system) closed #7

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