Building Pro XXL Table/Enclosure

Those are nice casters. :heart_eyes:

Here are the casters I want to mount to my table.
You mount them to the leg while it sits on the floor and use the lever when you want to move it.!
Casters

Those type casters are pretty good. You can buy an extra set of mounting brackets that stay on the bench and you can move the wheels around the shop and use them on different tables/benches. Then you get more bang for your buck. You usually only raise the object to move it and then drop it back down with the wheels doing nothing in the mean time. The only complaint I have with them is they stick out pretty far and if not placed in the right place they can be easily kicked and/or trip you. The leverage to raise them is not too bad but sometimes to reach the back legs can be hard if you are in close quarters with other objects. Additionally they do not raise your tool very far so if you have rough terrain to roll over you can get into trouble with this type. As long as your floor is reasonable level they work fine but you cannot go over any obstacles with them like the lip of a garage door etc.

This image is from Rockler.com. Some of the cheaper versions do not have the brackets.

image

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Got the top added to my enclosure today. Same as the rest of the panels I sandwiched the 2x2 framing between plywood skins and added 3 layers of ceiling tile again to fill the void between the 2x2 framing. I think I’m finally far enough along to paint the interior white and seal the access panel openings with vapor barrier to start making chips and use the shapeoko to make my access panels. I also have a 1/4" piece of plexiglass on order for the front door. I remember watching Winston’s enclosure build and his comments about the time taken to build it… I can now relate to what he said.

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Nice home for Wilson. I’m looking forward to seeing what it has been up to, in the contest thread!

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I’m sure Wilson will have time for a few more pictures/attempts between now and close of contest #20. It’s funny how building an enclosure is kind of like moving into a new place… Now Wilson needs to choose paint colors, select some lighting, choose some flooring (table top material), get central vac setup, etc… And for those who are reading this and have no idea who Wilson is well it’s the tennis ball mounted in Sweepy’s holder in the previous picture that’s made an appearance in the Community Contest #20.

(Edit: as for Community Challenge #20 I’m also looking into the different toolpath available in Fusion 360 to see if I can get different patterns/textures in the drawing)

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So today I took the Shapeoko out of the enclosure and did some sanding, crackfilling/hide fasteners, siliconed edges and got this 40lbs piece of 3/8 rubber to cover the worksurface and help dampen vibrations. Its actually a workout/exercise mat. Next step is prime and paint. Also going to use the spaces between the framing of the torsion tables for small drawers and hold tools, collets, etc… that is handy to have close by.

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Well that’s done but this was probably one of the most awkward things I’ve ever painted. I’ve painted on numerous occasions and never finished the job with as much paint transfer on my clothes, arms, face, head… At least the inside will be white so no more reaching in there with wet paint all around me.

(Edit: Changed picture for one with the Shapeoko in the encolsure. There was also enough of the rubber mat to have a pad to stand on while in front of the enclosure.

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Eric, I have those same casters from Rockler! But I also purchased some plates to mount on each Cabinet, table or whatever. Then with one set of wheels, you can use them on all equipment!! Tried to show link but I don’t know how. But thery are from https://www.rockler.com/

All my flip-carts and other machinery already have wheels so I currently have no need to move it around.
I think I saw an earlier post with that type caster.
Thank you for your response. :sunglasses:

I have this designed in Fusion 360 and getting ready to cut some parts on the CNC over the weekend (exciting times, first parts I’ll be cutting on the machine, setting Wilson aside for now) to assemble the front door. In the picture with the exposed parts the 2 most left vertical pieces are to overlap the sidewall of the enclosure by about a 1/2" with some weather stripping in that cavity to form a good seal when the door is closed. As for the rest of the voids in the framing I might as well continue what I started and fill them with 3 layers of drop ceiling. Lastly sandwich all the framing inside the 1/4" plywood like the rest of the enclosure. As for the bottom edge of the door I’m thinking of making it removable if ever I want to pass longer pieces through the enclosure for some tiling jobs. Biggest concern right now is using a heat gun to warm up the 2’ x 4’ x 1/4" Plexiglass to get that bend in it.

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Very Nice! Add some pics as you cut and build please.

Well got my first job done on the Shapeoko Pro and although it was a conservative (30 minutes) first attempt I feel it went fairly well. As I didn’t dial in my machine yet or even level the spoil board the final result was a contour that cut through my stock leaving a few spots with onion skin and better yet no marks in the spoilboard. I certainly could have placed the parts better for less waste but I’ll do that when I cut out another 4 of these parts for the door. The only thing that let me second guess myself was the occasional clicking sound coming from the machine during the cutting. At times there was as few as 1 or 2 of these clicks while other times there were more like 7 to 10 clicks in a row.



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A “click” may (or may not) indicate lost steps, what feeds and speeds/DOC were you running and how low did you have the sweepy ? Did the clicks occur near the end of the job ?

As suggested I looked up Winston’s material Monday video series and ended up going for a contour pass using the #201 endmill, RPM: 18000, feedrate: 1905mm/min, and a stepdown of 1.524mm or 0.06". Basically picked the middle of the road using Winston’s chart (listing hardwood, softwood, MDF). That said I’m pretty sure no steps we’re lost as there was not evidence of messed up toolpaths as the end results the parts ended up being the correct dimensions (xy plane) and the cut for the most part was through my stock or a thin onion skin and no toolpath marks left on the wasteboard. Pretty sure the slight variance in cutting all the way through would be fixed if I ran the job to level the wasteboard and square/tram the router.

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Yeah definitely not lost steps at those settings, on a Pro of all things.
Probably some other minor thing that is not important to worry about. If you end up having a repeatable way to produce those clicks, you could try and air job with the router turned off, to isolate the source of the clicks more easily.

LOL, baby steps. Learning to crawl before I start to fly.

I’ll be cutting many more parts after I get some sleep to assemble the door so will keep monitoring it but I’m thinking if it continues I’ll just byte the bullet and buy that $100 1 gallon of Vactra No. 2 way oil from Amazon.ca (Canadian) and give that a shot if the clicking is still around after a few more jobs.

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With my other little projects completed I’m back at the enclosure project and made some progress on the door tonight. That said I’m getting close to that point where I’ll need to bend a 2’ x 4’ x 1/4" polycarbonate window and I’ve never worked with this stuff. The research I’ve done so far indicates I can bend this stuff either cold or hot. If I go cold I’d likely need a break press to deal with this thickness of material and I do not have that available. The heating route seems to be susceptible to bubbling and possibly a yellowing of the material which is not great. As an alternative I’ve been considering using the CNC to cut down 1/8" (half the thickness) where I want the bend which would likely make cold bending the glass fairly easy by hand and would follow the cut line. Ideally I would use a 45deg V-bit which I could order. Then once framed in place into the door frame I would fill the small gap at the bend line with some polycarbonate filler/epoxy of some sort. Anyone with polycarbonate experience can weigh in here and let me know if this is a sound plan or not?

The amazon boxes are a good recycling of material. Will you eventually use plexiglass?

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The look of the Amazon boxes are growing on me but… they are definitely temporary. Going to finish the door so combined with these temp panels will contain dust until I get around to fabricate the removable side panels. Was considering Polycarbonate panels or a hybrid between the sandwiched panels I’ve done for the rest of the enclosure with a design cutout and filled with pieces of polycarbonate. Haven’t decided on this detail yet.

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