Cribbage Board Build Thread

I think its time to start this thread. Over the next 2 weeks I plan on stressing all my skills and tools to create this cribbage board. I had some objectives I wanted to get after…

  1. Incorporate wood and epoxy inlays
  2. Incorporate 3D carving and fine engraving
  3. Stress all my wood working tools and ability to use them efficiently

I think this is going hit all of it, and will be a major project. The wife wanted it…so might as well do it right!

Materials:
Black Walnut with Maple Inlays for the track
Black epoxy resin for lettering / fine lines
2x Lazy Susan’s (Idea is to be able to spin the compass and 4 player track independently from the overall board)

I’m super excited Fusion360 cooperated with designing and doing all the cut files. Fingers crossed for the Shapeoko.

Day 1 starts tomorrow gluing all the black walnut and prep work!

Lazy Susan :laughing:

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the preview looks fantastic (and challenging too) ! Can’t wait to see the first cuts.

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Start with some scrap and dial in your most complicated center piece ops and feeds if it goes well then go all in.

I am interested to see this finished

Your next challenge should be aluminum center art with aluminum accent rings with epoxy coated walnut. That would look sooo killer

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If I were doing something like this, I would make a separate “module” out of those approximately 500 holes.

Plan to fail at some point, and make it a bit easier to recover without starting the whole project over.

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@CrookedWoodTex i “module” each piece out to start. Broken into compass\4 player track\skunk and win track\ and then the base is broken into 3 machined pieces to assemble and glue.

But! This brings up something I’ve been worried about. The plan right now is to do the holes last. Last being after all of this…

  1. Reverse cut on the backside for Lazy Susan hardware
  2. Maple inlay around the 4 player track
  3. Black epoxy lines around each track
  4. Finished sanding with top coat epoxy.

That’s for every module

I hate to drill the holes and then pour the top coat epoxy finish and it mounds up/fills the holes in.

I’m running scrap cuts to verify everything before final cuts, but one miss step in the machine and it’s game over

Cut a lot of walnut today! The stuff I got is all ruff cut and sealed when they stored them. Most of this stuff is from the 70s.




I’m going to cheat a little bit and put some maple in the middle to save some of my walnut that’s not visible. With that, I wanted to practice jointing and glue ups. Im not worried about the depth of glue’d boards, I’m going to let the shapeako flatten them to depth. I want to see how accurate it is.


I want the grain moving downwards around the cribbage board, instead of the end grain showing. None of the edges are prepped yet to join. It’s been super fun matching the grain around the 15” diameter.

Still have a ton of material to work through, but stuff happened today

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Looking forward to seeing this project progress!

ohh that looks beautiful wood and walnut is so nice on the SO3 this thread had my curiosity now it has my attention!

Keep posting!

The walnuts is super nice…but these ruff cuts are testing my patience! Feels like I’m wasting a lot of material harvesting the right grain.

More cutting tonight!

I should have everything prepped and ready to CNC by the weekend.

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Yeah, processing lumber involves a lot of material removal — a typical 2x4 which is actually 1.5" x 3.5" is the result of removing over one-third of the rough-cut piece.

My suggestion is to just find suitable places for dumping the sawdust — since walnut is allelopathic I dump mine on gravel walkways and at the edges of the driveway

After work I decided to just do it already. This is technically my first big glue up I’ve done so fingers crossed :crossed_fingers:

First wood section is glued! :crossed_fingers:



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My glue up was a success!!!

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First part is cut….had one mistake…BUT I was there to catch it and stop it before the house burnt down.



I’m going to put a nice bevel on the bottom to merge the two peices.


Before someone says it…I know I wasted a ton of material…and it was on purpose…mainly working my shop tools more and working different cuts on the Shapeoko. It wasn’t the most practical, but that was deliberate.

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Looking over these lazy susan’s, I’m pretty happy with the quality of these. There’s no sounds, very minimal lateral movement within the bearings. These ended up costing a total of $25.

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What year??? Got a 31 in my shop under +.250 sawdust. Good luck on both projects

It’s a 30. I chopped it 5” and it’s been a neglected project. I have a 1958 392 Hemi at the machinist getting all supe’d up. When it gets back it might light a fire to get the car done.

I’ve been rebuilding and do all the gas lines on the carb setup for it. Still a work in progress.

I halve another 392 finished up, but still looking for the right car for it.

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I have a ton of updates…just a teaser

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Wanted to get some thoughts on a dilemma I’ve been going back and forth with…

I was putting a 30 degree chamfer where my main base and the top of the board meets to make the grain flow from the top down into the sides leading to the bottom base. My material moved in the machine and the bottom of the chamfer went outside the main circumference of the cut. Taking out about 3/8” with it, the over all height was going to be 1 1/4” to meet flush with the player track piece and compass.

I really do not want to cut another piece of walnut and another glue up. I’m thinking about now doing a layered effect with the 3 faces.



Is it tacky?? Or an improvement to the original design?

I double checked my clearance and I’ll still have enough meat “barely” to secure the lazy Susan’s.

I’m going to sleep on it. Any suggestions?

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I appears that the drawer will be sacrificed? The rendered photos are so far apart that it is difficult to compare the two designs.

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Sorry…I didn’t include the base and only the top portions. The drawer is still there and is the same as the original minus smaller in size

I’m getting ready to carve the numbers in this one and pour some black epoxy tonight :nerd_face:

Slow and steady with a 6.2 degree 1/16 tapered ball noise. Super impressed with it…I haven’t cleaned any of it yet

Sanding sealer before pouring epoxy

Quick change, the numbering was to small for my engraver so I put my families names in the circle. Tomorrow after the epoxy cures for 18hrs…I’ll face it down and cut the inner diameter for the compass to sit inside it

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