Die Filer (File Machine) Project for the Shapeoko3 AND the Nomad (The Files)


(Richard Cournoyer) #1

The File Machine is complete and ready to be published, but first, let’s view the machine:

Some Videos:

(This is the first run)

A 360 view of the finished machine

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Performance: It works incredibly well; it’s strong, tight and amazing versatile (File, Sand, Saw, even Burnish/polish) It uses the files you already own, meaning you don’t need to buy special expensive Die Files (But they will fit if you want to) What kind of files fit? Round, Square, Triangular, Flat, semi-round…the list goes on.

Build: My design was created with the beginner in mind, but yet fun for the experienced machinist. It’s easy to machine AND assemble, and it can be made on the Nomad and the Shapeoko (with OR without the metal table). It also can be made with standard shop tools (things you probably already have) and only a single End Mill!

Assembly: This design incorporates a method called Hole Transfer. What it essentially means is that you transfer one set of machined holes to a part that needs mating holes (or threads). Meaning if your machine is a little off, putting it together is still easy, and the results are a VERY precise machine that you will be very proud of.

While I work on the two videos (Machine and Assembly) I wanted to get you guys started, so here is everything you need to make this awesome machine. Since there is SO much information (about 30 pages of documentation plus 40 files of 2D and 3D Models) I will provide you with links to the files to keep this post clean.

Here is a list of what I am providing: (at No Cost to You, LOL)

  1. General Notes (Including Costs, Setup, and Assembly tooling requirements and recommendations, etc)
  2. Machining Guide (Part by Part) (A video will help, and it’s coming)
  3. Assembly Guide (Step by Step) (A video will help, and it’s coming)
  4. BOM (Bill of Material)
  5. Drawings (I call these Light Drawings since it’s a Model-Based Design, so Minimal info Dwg)
  6. Carbide Create Files (no tool paths, this is something YOU need to do)
  7. Solid Models (in Fusion360 format AND STEP format

Have fun and I hope you consider building this awesome machine!

Feel free to message me for minor corrections (spelling, incorrect word, grammar, missing information etc.)

Here are the links to the files and notes:

Notes: (items 1-4 above)
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B_OpqsbWS8NdRm9aazVCdXRRNHc

Drawings:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B_OpqsbWS8Ndb0xZY285NkVDTU0

Carbide Create Files:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B_OpqsbWS8NdT3VURHFlX1hLU0U

Solid Models:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B_OpqsbWS8NdSjlaQUt2aDBocTQ


Caged Goose (A Crazy Gift Idea)
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(Tito) #2

Can I just say “wow”?

I mean, really,… WOW!


(Richard Cournoyer) #3

The Machining Video is Posted!

Now go build something!


(Richard Cournoyer) #4

Now the Assembly Video(s) are also posted. You now have everything you need to make this awesome machine:

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Part 1 Video

Part 2 Video


(Rob Grzesek) #5

So, has anyone built their copy of the die filer yet?

The first person to post photos of their “JPLRichard Die Filer” gets a $200 credit in the Carbide Store.


(Scott Conant) #6

Ok, I feel real stupid…what the heck is it?


(Richard Cournoyer) #7

There are no stupid questions. Once upon a time before we head wire EDM machines, to machine the clearance on a Die (think punch and die), we used this type of machine t(file) o file the clearance (taper) on the inside of the die.

Now it’s used for a variety of machining operations, including removing the radius left from An and Mill, will you need a square corner, using sandpaper on a smooth file to apply a particular surface finish to an item (think watch case between the law logs) or sneaking up on something ultraprecise or ultra thin.

You can look at a few YouTube videos from a maker called ClickSpring.

Typing this on my iPhone without my glasses so I can’t see if I have any errors.


(Paul) #8

I’m intending to do this build as it is well documented and clearly a device I didn’t know I needed but now I want. Thank you, Richard C., for you hard work in putting this together, it is amazing. I have received the Carbide3d Probe (thanks Carbide3d) and will start gathering raw material.