Anyone Use Box-o-matic for their CNC

Box-o-Matic id a tool that generated SVG files for various box/ joinery styles. Seems similar to some features in VCarve that does similar stuff.

I am waiting on my 5 which will be my first CNC but currently make boxes mostly via a router jig or by hand. I am hoping the CNC can help especially with drawers that can be very tedious if you have a lot to build

Curious if anyone has used this of similar tools.

https://getboxomatic.com/

The problem is, these designs are workable because they assume the narrow kerf of a laser.

I looked into using such generators on our machines at:

There are a lot of other joinery options, esp.:

which is discussed at:

and which I looked into at:

The SO5’s optional overhang allows one to cut traditional joinery if one builds a vertical fixture, and are willing to commit to the additional operations which that entails.

I’ve been working on a joinery technique:

which has been successful to the point that I’ve begun a serious project using it — have the stock, and it’s mostly drawn up — should be cutting this evening or the next.

If you have a box style and dimensions (height, width, depth, stock thickness and lid style)

I’ve done sliding:

and hinged:

Let me know and I’ll gladly work up step-by-step instructions for drawing it up in Carbide Create.

If you have any other ideas or suggestions, I’d be glad of them.

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I use www.makercase.com as it allows you to add in dogbones for CNC.

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If you’re willing to allow visible voids, and endgrain.

A cabinetmaker whom I learned an awful lot from, hanging out in his shop after school (he was my great aunt’s bridge partner’s husband) had this to say about endgrain in a piece of wood:

It’s like a person’s belly button — you know a person has one, but you probably don’t want to see it.

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In some cases I think it is a cool part of the aesthetic, but usually laminated material like baltic birch. But that may just be the old skateboarder in me. :smiley:

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