Speeds, Feeds, Power, and Force (SFPF) Calculator

Here’s a free Microsoft Excel workbook that facilitates the estimation and logging of CNC machining parameters and performance. The three tabs at the bottom left of the workbook access worksheets showing estimated parameters for a 60,000 RPM HF Spindle, the Makita 0701 Router, and Dewalt DWP611 Router in Shapeoko 3s. The maximum spindle/router speeds were used on each sheet to minimize cutting forces. The same 1/8" 3 flute endmill with 0.25" DOC and 0.005" WOC in 6061-T6 aluminum with ~0.001 (IPT) chip-load was used for all three.
The compressed file folder also contains some use instructions, which I’ll update if there is enough interest expressed to justify doing so. As always I welcome feedback, comments, and questions. :slightly_smiling_face:
2019-09-12 SPDF Workbook.zip (688.1 KB)
2019-09-18 Edit: See this post (29) for the latest workbook and related info/links. (Added worksheets for cutting plywood with different parameters and spindles.)

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This will take some time for me to figure out, but I appreciate the effort. Perhaps a tab for the Carbide Compact Router could be added since that is what ships with the S3 now. Mine has a max rpm of 32,000. I don’t have access to it now to check the current or power rating.

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Carbide Compact Router specs. say “RPM range is 12,000 - 30,000”. Neither input current or power are mentioned (maybe @WillAdams knows or can find out?) But, don’t “sweat the small stuff”, just use the Makita sheet - it’s likely “close enough for government work”. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Questions about the specific capabilities / specifications of the Carbide Compact Router will have to go to @Jorge, @Luke, @edwardrford and the other folks who are in a position to know / test the specifics (I don’t even have one, still rocking my Makita RT0701).

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Nice work @gmack.

Perhaps this has been discussed in one of the other F&S threads but I was curious if it is possible to (somehow) incorporate calculations for machine deflection as well in this spreadsheet? Could be a useful parameter to include when you are optimizing your cut parameters.

Thanks!
Machine deflection is caused by both cutting forces and geometry. Cutting geometry is highly variable, so it’s a lot easier to measure than estimate/predict. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Will,
I feel bad about cluttering up those other threads with the old posts related to this. Is there an easy way to move them to this or a separate SFPF History thread?

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Give us a list of posts you’d like consolidated and the threads you’d like them moved to and we’ll see what can be done.

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Thanks Will! Here’s the list of posts to move to the new “Speeds, Feeds, Power, and Force (SFPF) Calculator History” thread.Posts to Move to Speeds, Feeds, Power, and Force (SFPF) Calculator History .zip (9.7 KB)

Could you do the list of posts as a text file or something? I don’t have Excel.

You hurt my feelings dude - you haven’t even tried the workbook? Posts to Move to Speeds, Feeds, Power, and Force (SFPF) Calculator History (2).zip (563 Bytes)

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Sorry, just haven’t had occasion to have to install a spreadsheet on this machine.

Google Docs will open Excel files.

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Yes, but it’s not perfect about it, and since it works best in Chrome, doesn’t work well for me, since Google bought into the stupid idea of a stylus being used for scrolling, so even though I’ve configured Google Chrome to not do so, clicking with the stylus doesn’t work reliably.

@WillAdams This might interest you.
https://github.com/Nekomajin42/spreadsheet-blocks

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You may want to get Open Office and try if the worksheet formulas and control work properly in your environment.

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Amazingly cool, but:

The application generates syntactically correct formulas, but does not evaluate them.

If it just did evaluation, it’d be awesome.

My problem is, I’m still looking for a replacement for Lotus Improv and can’t justify Quantrix Financial Modeler.

Do you use WordPerfect too? :grin:

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No, TeX/LaTeX — fond of WordPerfect, but the best implementation was on NeXTstep, and unfortunately, my Cube won’t boot up anymore, and it was never compiled for Sparc (one of these days I’ll dig through all my boxes and find a mouse and keyboard for my Sparc 5 and get it booted up again).

If you’ve never used Lotus Improv, you should at least look up Quantrix Financial Modeler.

In the mid-90s a former boss of mine had a NeXTcube sitting under his desk, but he never booted it up as far as I know. He brought it with him from when he worked at NeXT–evidently he knew Steve Jobs too.

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